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Annual Art Trip


Annual Art Trip

On Friday, April 7, 34 art students travelled to the great city of Boston for the annual Arts Field Trip.

The first stop along the tour was Diablo Glass School, where students were divided into three groups: the hot shop, flat shop, and flame shop. In the hot shop, students got a taste of the ancient art of glassblowing by making their own drink ware. Students learned how to gather glass from the furnace, control it, and shape it. In the flame shop, students worked with a stationary propane/oxygen torch and Borosilicate glass to create a custom glass pendant. Finally in the flat shop, students learned the art of fusing and slumping. They worked by cutting glass, arranging colors and shapes, and finished with beautiful plates, platters, or chimes.


The group then attended Boston Design Week at the Cyclorama in the South End. Boston Design Week seeks to increase public awareness and appreciation of all aspects of design, foster recognition of the vital role design plays in our lives, and bring new audiences to a wide array of design industries and organizations. Their vision is to encourage the public to explore all aspects of design. Exhibitors offer modern and contemporary furnishings, decorative arts, jewelry, fine art and prints, home décor. Students had time to take in the show, chat with artists, and gain artistic insight.


To round out the day, the tour then met with artist Ari Hauben in his Boston studio, the 'Boston Button Factory.' Ari Hauben is a contemporary artist with a very unique style that he has developed through trial and error, happy accidents, and hours and hours of work. His style could be defined as blending pop and street art techniques into mixed media works. The process predominantly involves newspaper, epoxy, spray paint, and layering techniques that are integrated into a variety of visual platforms. Often times he constructs the images within his pieces using newspaper print from relevant articles for the dual purpose of creating meaning for the work, as well as adding an element of perspective. This is because as the viewer gets closer to the artwork, the words begin to appear, giving the work added texture and revealing its underlying theme.

Students got to watch Ari's process, view his work, ask questions, and even had the chance to work with the artist to create an AOF custom canvas.